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BTME Winners of Ryder Draw get to see the light

Customer Insight
26.01.2019
David Feeney, Deputy Head Greenkeeeper at Prestwick Golf Club was the first day's winner of the Ryder Prize Draw
David Feeney, Deputy Head Greenkeeeper at Prestwick Golf Club was the first day's winner of the Ryder Prize Draw at BTME, where he received his prize from Rod Burke of Syngenta

BTME Harrogate proved to be an outstandingly great success this year.

It was a fantatstic opportunity for all greenkeepers and turf managers to see the latest developments; learn from the wealth of education and experience some future technology that will aid decisions - and that was just on the ever busy Syngenta stand.  

Syngenta stand buzzing and busy with customers at BTME 2019

Each day a lucky winner of a powerful professional light meter was drawn from the stand visitors finding out more about Ryder turf pigment.

And the winners of the Ryder Prize Draw were:

Day 1: David Feeney, Deputy Head Greenkeeper at Prestwick Golf Club

Day 2: Nicholas Meehan, Course Manager of Brampton Park Golf Club

Day 3: Paul Rudkin, Course Manager of Sundridge Park Golf Club

Jim Croxton of BIGGA with Glenn Kirby for light meter draw

Thank-you to Jim Croxton, Chief Executive of BIGGA (above) and BIGGA President, Chris Sheehan (below), for drawing the winners' names.

Chris Sheehan of BIGGA with Glenn Kirby for light meter draw

Syngenta Technical Manager, Glenn Kirby, advocated that understanding the levels of light are hitting the surface, where and when during the day, is extremely important in making decisions to make light work more efficiently using Ryder applications.

“Only a relatively small spectrum of sunlight can be physiologically absorbed and utilised by turf plants - the PAR light,” he pointed out. “Light waves at either end of the spectrum can be potentially damaging to plant tissue.

“Furthermore, the amount of PAR light reaching open turf surfaces can be far in excess of the plants’ ability to photosynthesise and turn it into energy,” he advised.

“Managing light levels impacting on plants is now recognised as a crucial part of an Integrated Turf Management programme,” he advocated. “Ryder turf pigment has shown to enhance the naturalistic green colour of turf surfaces throughout the season, and also offers the chance to manage and mitigate against harmful levels of light affecting plants.”

“Now we can start measuring the amount of PAR light getting to the plant we can begin to gauge what’s happening in the plant and monitor it’s impact, The light intensity measured by the Field Scout shows how intense the PAR light can be."

Look out for the NEW Turf Rewards 2019 website and offers – when you will be able to use the points for a Field Scout Light Meter to help better manage sunlight in the future